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Scheduling A Meeting? Tips on Being Efficient

Scheduling a Meeting
By Artist's Strategy

When it comes to scheduling, we all need to take a special course. For years, I have gotten tangled up in countless emails about potential times to talk, meet and / or work. Someone starts with a simple “Should we find a time to talk?” Two minutes later, “sure”. Then we get the “Wednesday is no good for me” from someone else. And it goes on and on, only to find a time that will have to be changed three days later when person X chimes in because that time no longer works for them. And the scheduling hamster wheel begins again.

Who has time for any of that?

Figuring out your system of scheduling could be a shockingly effective time saver. In a digital world with so many modes of messaging and communicating, being able to work through potentially tedious tasks such as constant scheduling is key.

It won’t take much to change your messy scheduling ways. Below are some key pointers for those looking to finesse their process:

1. If scheduling with 1-3 people, offer up 3 (no more and no less) times and general locations that could work for you. If scheduling with 4 or more people, use a scheduling application like doodle and offer up 6-10 times and general locations.

2. Offered times should be within a 7 day window of time.

3. Once a date / time has been selected, send out… something along the lines of a Google cal invite to make sure all info is in one place.

4. Follow up 48 hours in advance of your scheduled meeting to confirm final details.

5. In general, stay in brief but frequent communication. Often when upcoming meetings seem loosey goosey, people are more likely to drop them as the date approaches for something more solid. If someone feels like *you* may cancel, the likelihood of them de-prioritizing your meeting goes up a bunch.

6. If it’s known that the meeting can’t happen for a few weeks, put in your calendar when you plan to follow up to get the time on the books.

Overall, scheduling seems like a bottom of the totem pole priority but think about the lengthy, flighty process for scheduling you often get caught up in. Take responsibility for your fellow artists as well as yourself. You and your project will thank you.

By Joshua Morgan for Artist’s Strategy.
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Artist's Strategy

Also by Artist’s Strategy:

How to Get on Top of Those Loose Threads

Scheduling Your Social Media Clean Up

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